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Tag Archives: SQL 2008 R2

SQL Server Cluster LooksAlive and IsAlive Check


Windows Cluster Service use the “heartbeat” process to check whether each node is alive at both the OS level and SQL Server level. Heartbeat signals works on UDP.

Microsoft Windows Cluster service perform 2 health checks to perform node & resource availability check.

LooksAlive Health Check

1) LooksAlive is a quick lightweight health check

2) Run at interval of 5 Seconds

3) Does not impact performance but does not perform a thorough check

4) The check will succeed if the service appears to be running even though it might not be operational

5) If Fails calls “IsAlive” health check

6) Polling interval can be changed by adjusting LooksAlivePollInterval property of Cluster service

IsAlive Health Check

1) Run at interval of each 60 Second

2) Perform more detail check then LooksAlive

3) Run @@SERVERNAME to ensure that SQL Server is responding to queries

4) Does not ensure that all user databases are operational

5) Retired 5 times & then try to reconnect SQL Server

6) If all 5 retry fails, the SQL Server resource fails & Windows Cluster service will try to bring it online on other node as per configuration

7) Polling interval can be changed by adjusting IsAlivePollInterval property of Cluster service

Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

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Creation & Deletion of Database Snapshot by SQL Agent Job


Some days back, I received one query on my facebook page that user want to create Database Snapshot frequently & want to delete the oldest with same frequency. Quite interesting scenario. I did not go in deep why he has such requirement but I am clear that It can be done very easily.

So let’s do it. I have setup 2 scripts one for creation of snapshot & another is for deletion of snapshot. We can schedule a SQL agent jobs with 2 steps using these scripts.

Step 1 :-

DECLARE @CREATE_SS VARCHAR(MAX)

DECLARE @DT VARCHAR(100)

SET @DT = REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR,GETDATE(),120),’-‘,’_’),’ ‘,’_’),':’,’_’)

SET @CREATE_SS =

‘CREATE DATABASE TEST_’+@DT+’ ON

( NAME = TEST, FILENAME =

”C:\TEST_’+@DT+’.SS” )

AS SNAPSHOT OF TEST’

EXEC (@CREATE_SS)

Step 2 :-

IF(SELECT COUNT(*) FROM SYS.DATABASES WHERE SOURCE_DATABASE_ID = DB_ID(‘TEST’))>1

BEGIN

DECLARE @DROP_SS VARCHAR(MAX)

DECLARE @SS_NAME VARCHAR(100)

SELECT TOP 1 @SS_NAME = NAME FROM SYS.DATABASES WHERE SOURCE_DATABASE_ID = DB_ID(‘TEST’)

ORDER BY CREATE_DATE ASC

SET @DROP_SS = ‘DROP DATABASE ‘+ @SS_NAME

EXEC (@DROP_SS)

END

Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

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Renaming or Changing SQL Server Cluster Instance


Renaming or Changing SQL Server cluster instance process is bit different from renaming a stand-alone instance.

Refer : Rename or Change SQL Server Standalone Default Instance http://mssqlfun.com/2014/06/30/rename-or-change-sql-server-standalone-default-instance/)

Refer : Rename or Change SQL Server Standalone Named Instance (http://mssqlfun.com/2014/07/29/rename-or-change-sql-server-standalone-named-instance/)

The name of the virtual server is always the same as the name of the SQL Network Name (the SQL Virtual Server Network Name). You can change the name of the virtual server, you cannot change the instance name like in the case of standalone named instance. You can change a virtual SQL server named SQLServerinstance1 to some other name, such as SQLServerNewinstance1, but the instance part of the name, instance1, will remain unchanged.

Rename a virtual server :-

1. Using Cluster Administrator, change the SQL Network Name or SQL Server DNS Name to the new name.

2. Take the network name resource offline. This takes the SQL Server resource and other dependent resources offline as well.

3. Bring the SQL Server resource back online.

Verify the Renaming Operation :-

1) Using @@ServerName

2) Using sys.servers

Minimize network propagation delay :-

ipconfig /flushdns

ipconfig /registerdns

nbtstat –RR

You are done ! You should ask your application teams to reconnect with new Name or if they are using IP address then no changes required.

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Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

Cumulative Update – 12 for SQL Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 2 Is Now Available !


The 12th cumulative update release for SQL Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 2 is now available for download at the Microsoft Support site. Cumulative Update 12 contains all the hotfixes released since the initial release of SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2.

Those who are facing severe issues with their environment, they can plan to test CU12 in test environment & then move to Production after satisfactory results.

To other, I suggest to wait for SP3 final release to deploy on your production environment, to have consolidate build.

KB Article For CU12 of SQL Server 2008 R2 SP2

Previous Cumulative Update KB Articles:

· CU#11 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2926028

· CU#10 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2908087

· CU#9 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2887606

· CU#8 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2871401

· CU#7 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2844090

· CU#6 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2830140

· CU#5 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2797460

· CU#4 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2777358

· CU#3 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2754552

· CU#2 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2740411

· CU#1 KB Article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2720425

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Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

How to add node to SQL Server Failover Cluster from SQL Server 2008 onwards ?


Steps : How to add node to SQL Server Failover Cluster from SQL Server 2008 onwards ?

1) Open SQL Server Installation Center > Click Installation from Left > Click Add node to a SQL Server Failover Cluster from right

2) Click Run to start setup

3) Click Ok to cont., In case of any failure, you need to fix that first

4) Enter Product Key & click Next

5) Accept EULA & Click Next

6) Click Install to install setup files

7) Click Next, In case of any failure, you need to fix that first

8) Enter Product Key & Click Next

9) Accept EULA & Click Next

10) Select SQL instance to add node

11) Enter Service account password & Click Next. You cannot change service account here, it must be same as existing setup

12) Click Next after Error reporting option

13) Check Setup Rules & click Next. In case of any failure, you need to fix that first

14) Check Configuration & Click install to start installation

15) Installation in progress

16) Installation completed successfully

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Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

How to install SQL Server Failover Cluster from SQL Server 2008 onwards ?


Steps to install SQL Server Failover Cluster from SQL Server 2008 onwards :-

1) Open SQL Server Installation Center > Go to Installation from Left > Click on New SQL Server Failover installation from right

2) Click RUN to start setup

3) Click ok after validation check. In case of any failure, you need to clear that first

4) Click INSTALL, to install setup files

5) Click Next to cont.

6) Enter Product Key & click Next

7) Accept the EULA & Click Next

8) Select Features, you want to install & Click Next

9) Specify SQL Server instance name & Click Next

10) Check Disk space requirement & Click Next

11) Mention SQL Server Cluster Group Name & Click Next

12) Select Cluster Disk, You want to use for installation & Click Next

13) Provide SQL Server Cluster VIP & Click Next

14) Check your security policy & Click Next

15) Specify Service accounts & Click Next

16) Add User to work as SYSADMIN & Click Next

17) Set error reporting options & click Next

18) Click Next (In case of any failure, you need to fix that)

19) Check all configurations & Click Next

20) Installation Started

21) Installation Completed successfully

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Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

Antivirus Exclusion Policy for SQL Server


Anti-virus & SQL Server on one system together are friends not enemies, if configured properly.

Anti-virus are very useful programs from security, audit & venerability detection & removal point of view. But if team managing anti-virus server did not configure anti-virus policies properly then your SQL Server is going to face the problem.

Here, we will discuss the file types that must be in exclusion list of anti-virus scanning policy. In other words, Let anti-virus programs deal with what they do best, and let SQL Server handle what it does best and avoid, at all possible costs, any interaction between the two

1. Binaries: Or the the paths to the actual executable for any of your running SQL Server Services (MSSQL, SQL Server Agent, SSAS, etc). Typically these are found, by default, in the C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server folder – though this could easily be a different path on many production machines. (And, note, you’ll likely want to make sure that C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server is included in any exclusions as well on x64 machines).

2. SQL Server Error Logs : Not your database log files, but the text files that SQL Server uses to keep its own ‘event logs’ running or up-to-date. (Which, in turn is also different than Windows’ system event logs as well.) By default the path to these files is, in turn, covered in the paths outlined above – or it’s part of the ‘program files’ data associated with your binaries – though you CAN move the location of these logs if desired (as an advanced operation via the startup parameters).)

3. Data And Log Files: Your actual .mdf, .ndf, and .ldf files – or the locations of your data files and log files. (Which you’ll want to make sure get excluded from anything that anti-virus monitors – otherwise creation of new databases, file-growth operations, and other normal ‘stuff’ can/will get blocked by anti-virus operations – which would be fatal in many cases.)

4. Backups: Yes, the path to any of your backups – or backup locations is also something you’ll want to make sure that anti-virus doesn’t monitor.

5. Others: Any other files related to SQL server & for its proper working. Like .TUF, .SS, .TRC etc.

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Reference : Rohit Garg (http://mssqlfun.com/)

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